How to Self-Publish a Bestseller: Publishing 3.0

book

(the most popular self-published book in history)

[a slightly revised version of an article I published last week on TechCrunch]

 

My most recent book, “Choose Yourself!” sold 53,000 copies since it’s release on June 3 [update December 30 – just hit over 100,000 copies], hit the Wall Street Journal Bestseller list, was No. 1 on Amazon for all non-fiction books for a few days and is still flirting with No. 1 in its various categories. This post is about what I did differently, why I did it differently, and how I think anyone can do this to self-publish a bestseller. I describe all the numbers, who I hired and why, and how I made the various choices I did.

I strongly believe everyone reading this blog has the content inside of them to write a book. If you want to stand out in a world of content, you need to underline your expertise. Publishing a book is not just putting your thoughts on a blog post. It’s an event. It shows your best curated thoughts and it shows customers, clients, investors, friends and lovers what the most important things on your mind are right now.

Unfortunately, most people suck at it. I’ve largely sucked at it. I’ve published 11 books — five with traditional publishers and six that are self-published.b

I’ve written before about publishing and self-publishing. But mostly it’s been how I lost money on every book I’ve written. This is the first time I can say I’ve published a good selling book and here is what I did.

The distinction now is no longer between “traditional publishing” versus “self-publishing.” The distinction now is between professional versus unprofessional publishing. My first 10 books were done unprofessionally. Even the ones with the big publishing houses. They will probably hate me now. I hope not. I really like the people I worked with at these publishers.

I hope that everyone self-publishes. The benefits are enormous:

More money. Unless you are a John Grisham or E L James you will make much more money by professionally self-publishing. It’s not just money on sales but also foreign rights and special packages that you can offer if you control all the rights to your work. Packages that the traditional publishers almost never go for.

Incidentally, both of those authors self-published their first books. EL James, in fact, sold 250,000 copies of “50 Shades” via Createspace/Amazon before publishers even noticed her.

[See, “Why 50 Shades of Grey is Great Literature”]

Control over design. Traditional publishers usually keep that control.

Speed. You will probably speed up your publication date by over a year or more if you self-publish.

Content control. My bet is close to 100 percent of the people reading this post have content in them strong enough for a book. But 22-year-old interns at publishing companies won’t recognize that content. Even the editors, the publishers, the marketing guys — most of them — will not recognize the message you have to offer. Which leads me to…

Avoiding bad things in life. I hate getting that feeling of, “I hope he or she chooses me for X.” Where “X” could be love, or an investment, an acquisition, publishing a book, buying my product, whatever. I try to limit this feeling in my life whenever possible. I HATE when I have to depend on other people choosing me.

When you have to deal with more and more layers of people who have to choose you, you don’t get the opportunity to choose yourself (!), which is infinitely more valuable.

nationalbestsellerEnter Publishing 3.0: How To Professionally Self-Publish Your Next Book

Here’s what I did step-by-step with my latest book for the first month since publication.

1) Build your platform

A traditional publisher is not even going to look at you unless you have your own platform, which means a Twitter following, Facebook following and/or a significant blog following. But if you already can hand-deliver the customers, what do you need the traditional publisher for?

Wasn’t that supposed to be what the publishers would get for you? Don’t they get you in bookstores? The answer is “no.”

Bookstores take very few of the books published by publishers. And whenever you see a book facing forward, or on the front table, or a “staff pick” that means the publisher usually paid to have that special placement. Most books don’t get this. And if you don’t get that, chances are your books won’t sell.

2) How do you build your platform?

Have an honest voice. Don’t be afraid to say things about either yourself or your industry. Provide unique perspective. If it doesn’t bleed it doesn’t lead. Make sure every post or video you do bleeds from the heart, entertains, and educates. In that order.

How do you get traffic? Blog on bigger sites that aggregate bloggers or podcasts or whatever. It takes time to build up. But sincere voices will always rise to the top.

3) Write

This is not a post about writing or how to write a good book. The assumption is that you will write a good book. BUT, two tips: write 500-2000 words every day to keep exercising the writing muscle. And read good writers every day. Then you will write an even better book.

A typical book is anywhere from 40,000-80,000 words. So if you can average 1,000 words a day, seven days a week, you can write four to eight books a year. Or one very very good, edited, revised, professional one. Or 10! Knock yourself out!

I also wanted a high-quality foreword for the book. I was really grateful that Dick Costolo, CEO of Twitter, agreed to do mine. I realize why he used to be an improv comedian when I read what he wrote.

4) Know What You Want

If you are self-publishing then you can publish your book right now without any other effort. Go to CreateSpace (owned by Amazon), check the box that you want to be both paperback and Kindle, pick a cover, upload your manuscript, and in a few days you will be published on Amazon and people can start buying your book.

If your goal is to have a published book and use it to get customers, consulting gigs, speaking gigs, etc., or a beginning set of readers for your next book, then by all means publish this way. It’s the fastest way to do it. I highly recommend it.

But if your goal is to put out the best possible product, maximize the money you make, and get the most readers, then follow the next steps, what I call “Publishing 3.0.”

  • 1.0 was publishing with a traditional publisher.
  • 2.0 was when the stigma of self-publishing went away and an entire new artistic outlet was open to millions of people (15 million books published last year versus 300,000 10 years ago). It’s cheap, quick, and easy to get your book published.
  • 3.0 is starting right now — where you can self-publish better, more successfully, better edited, better designed, better marketed, and make more money than if you go any other route. The reason this is possible only now is because for the first time, the best editors, designers, marketers are no longer working at the big publishing houses. Instead, they are striking out on their own and independently charging for their services. The demand is there. This route is more expensive than “publishing 2.0” but is much more lucrative.
5) Editing

Previously my editing was just a spell check. And that was more than some of my mainstream publishers did. My wife asked me if I was kidding on this. But I told her to read my second book and she stopped questioning it. In other words, it was awful.

With my latest book, I went all out. I hired two copy editors to go through the basics on spelling and grammar. Then I hired Command Z Editing, run by Nils Parker, to help me structurally edit, i.e. do the job that editors used to do (example: Maxwell Perkins in the 1930s) but have been sorely lacking in the past 20 years from traditional publishers. Nils has previously edited bestsellers from Tucker Max, Kamal Ravikant, Ryan Holiday, and a dozen writers, as well as written screenplays, books, etc.

I am not saying “hire Nils” by the way. I’m just saying this is who I used (and paid). Make sure who you use is among the best in the world, or else you aren’t taking advantage of what the Publishing 3.0 world has to offer. Nils and I went back and forth on more than 15 different rewrites for my book. The difference between the original version and the final version is like the difference between chicken shit and chicken salad.

And yes, publishers have editors. Some very good ones. But I specifically wanted to choose my own editor and use an editor that has worked on books that have sold millions of copies. The entire idea of “Publishing 3.0” is that I am not limited to who is on the publisher’s staff but I can pick the absolute best people in the industry. With millions of books out there, the competition is incredible.

Hiring the best editor, design firm, marketing firm, and audio firms were all part of that. Not just the best around but who I felt were the best in the world.

6) Design

I never liked any of the designs on my traditionally published books, but I had no control over them. I don’t mean this to sound so anti-publisher. But they were busier with bigger authors, and I don’t think they were always able to devote resources to me.

I made sure I put out a product I could be proud of. I used Erin Tyler Design who helped me find the right cover designer, and she also managed the interior design process, which was a lot trickier than I thought.

She designed the spine, picked the fonts, the inside flaps, the back cover, and all the quirks — tables, pictures, asides, etc. — inside the book and then helped format for when I uploaded to Kindle Direct on Amazon.

7) Audiobook

I was at a dinner that Amazon had for self-published authors last October.

One guy who was making a solid living self-publishing science fiction novels told me that he always made an audiobook. I thought that was a horrible idea, and told him so.

But two things about audiobooks:

  1. He said, “When people see you have an audiobook, they see your book as even more credible. It stands out from the average self-published book when you have an e-book, a print version, and an audiobook. Plus, the audio book is more expensive, so even though there are fewer sales, it’s decent money.” By the way, if you self-publish, always do a print book at the very least. Even if 99 percent of your sales are going to be e-book.
  2. I asked the head of an ad agency what marketing tips he had for my upcoming book. He said, first thing, “Make an audiobook. For your kind of book, people will love listening to it while they drive into work.”

So Claudia, my wife who has been supportive of every aspect of this effort, set up her office in our house to be a mini-recording studio. I wrote to Tucker Max that I was going to make an audiobook. He wrote back:

“James, where are you doing the audio, and who’s editing it? Please tell me you aren’t just doing it yourself with your Mac and a mic you bought online.”

We looked at our Mac and a mic that we had just bought online and decided to go to a professional studio. Tucker suggested John Marshall Media. They had done audiobooks ranging from President Clinton’s autobiography to the Harry Potter books to Freakonomics.

It was a thoroughly annoying experience but it was worth it.

I felt uncomfortable just sitting there for eight hours reading words I had written. For one thing, it hurt. Reading for eight straight hours was killing my throat.

Second, I didn’t want to just read stories I had already written. So I did it totally unabridged and improvised quite a bit, making it somewhat original compared to the book.

But the best reason for doing the audiobook is it forces you to really look at your writing and hear what works and what doesn’t. I rewrote about 20 percent of the book after reading things that didn’t quite sound right out loud.

It meant another round of edits (with the help of Nils) to improve the book, a process I never would have gone through if I hadn’t done the audio version.

8) Title

This deserves its own category. I had total control over the title. My first choice for the book was “The Choose Yourself Era.” But whenever anyone asked me to say the title I had trouble saying it. “Era” sounds like “Error.” One person asked me if it was going to a book about archaeology. So somehow it wasn’t working.

So I picked 10 titles that I liked, combined them with the cover and created Facebook ads that I sent out to all my friends and friends of friends in the U.S. Then I sat back and watched the click-throughs. After a few days and thousands of click-throughs I had my title.

“The Choose Yourself Era” came in a distant third place. “Pick Yourself!” was right above it in second place. And “Choose Yourself!” came in first by far.

I then took the same Facebook approach to pick the subtitle and the final version of the cover design.

Results of the Facebook Title test:

pie

 

9) Marketing

I used Ryan Holiday’s company Brasscheck. Ryan is the head of marketing for American Apparel, and has marketed many bestsellers, including books by Tim Ferriss (“The Four Hour Chef”), Robert Greene (“Mastery”), Tucker Max (“I Hope They Serve Beer in Hell”), and others.

I had never before used an outside agency, always trusting either my own basic platform or a publisher. What Ryan provided was unbelievable. Between his Rolodex and mine we scheduled about 60 podcasts, radio interviews, speaking engagements and guest posts on popular blogs and websites.

There were also some other things that I would not have been able to coordinate: A Reddit AMA that got over 3,000 comments and probably close to a million views over the past month. His company created a SlideShare presentation that became the most viewed SlideShare on the site the week of the launch with over 300,000 views. My schedule the month after launch was non-stop marketing. I was burnt out by the end of the month.

I had also become a fan of Bitcoin. So I set up bitcoin.chooseyourself.us a month before I released the book and became the first book ever pre-released solely on bitcoin. Ryan then got several key media sources to cover this. Then, early buyers of the book were able to publish a reviews as soon as the book came out on Amazon.

I also wanted to market an offer in the beginning of the book. My goal was not to necessarily make the most money but to make sure the message reached as many people as possible. So on the very first page, before the editorial information and dedication, there is “the offer.”

I offer to pay people back for the book if they could prove to me that they bought it and read it. Then I would pay them back completely for the book (losing money on each transaction because of the cut Amazon takes plus shipping). The idea was I would be happy to give the book for free, but I know people don’t value things they get for free. And I also know most people don’t read the books they buy. Hence the offer.

Ryan was successful at making sure that the offer itself was covered in various media outlets.

Brasscheck also scripted the video trailer that was produced and animated by Simplifilm. I describe the results of the marketing below.

10) Foreign Rights

I found with my prior books that the traditional publishers would more or less wait for foreign publishers to call and then they would sell the rights and my split would be minimal. Typically the split was 50-50, but out of my 50 would come my agent’s split. I was competing with too many of the other authors in the publisher’s stable to get any attention from foreign publishers.

Now I own all the rights to my book. Most people who self-publish aren’t thinking foreign rights. You still have to have someone who is going to be your advocate with the foreign publishers. So I got a foreign rights agency, 2 Seas Agency, to handle all of the foreign rights on a commission basis. They go to book conferences all over the world and have connections in each country.

In June, the first month the book was out, Marleen Seegers from 2 Seas sold rights to: Brazil (USD 2500), China (USD 4300), Korea (USD 5000). She is currently in negotiations with publishers from 10 other countries. The three mentioned above are where  the contracts were finished blindingly fast.

11) Other Merchandise

Since I own the rights I can do whatever I want. Below in the “Numbers” section I describe a bundle I put together combining a hardcover version of the book with three earlier books plus some original writing that was sent out by an e-newsletter company that did all of the fulfillment and split the proceeds with me.

With the help of The Social Pages and Litographs I also made a poster that is designed like the cover of the book when you look from afar but when you get close to it you see clearly all 67,000 words of the book.  I’m also making that into a shirt. What will I do with it? I have no idea. But it’s fun and I wanted to do it.

In the below photos you can see the far away version and the words when you are standing about an inch from the poster.

poster

12) The Numbers

First off, what were my prior numbers? Here are my advances on my first mainstream-published, five books in order: $5,000, $7,500, $30,000, $100,000 and $30,000. Advances are coming down quickly!

My first book made back my advance and with about a 10 percent royalty I probably made another few thousand dollars on it. None of my other books came close to making back their advances.

I don’t have all the numbers on my first five self-published books, but I gave an enormous number of books away for free in order to build up my readership. Almost all of those books I produced for free but my revenues were minimal even though I had many readers for them.

In the first week “Choose Yourself!” was out I made the WSJ Bestsellers List with about 10,000 copies sold. To hit the New York Times bestseller list I can tell you anecdotally (and it depends on the week) that you need about 2,500-3,000 copies sold in your first week. I couldn’t get on the NYT Bestsellers List because they do not look at books that do not appear in bookstores. I’m not in any bookstores at the moment, although I’m working on ways that can change. Suffice to say I would have hit that list as well as the WSJ list.

In the first month I sold 44,294 copies between my paperback, audio, e-book, and even hardcover versions. In the second month so far, almost another 10,000 books.

The hardcover version was sold via an email newsletter, run by Porter Stansberry, that bundled the hardcover with three free versions of my past books plus an original report written by me. He split the proceeds 50-50 with me after the cost of the hardcover was recovered. I sold about 20,000 through this method in the first month. Email marketing is almost never attempted by mainstream publishers.

Of the remaining 24,000, close to 50 percent was Kindle, 45 percent was CreateSpace and 5 percent was Audible. On all the Amazon Kindle sales, the royalty is 70 percent of the $4.99 cost. On the Audible version the royalty is approximately 52 percent, give or take a few percentage points. On CreateSpace the royalty given my pricing was about 26 percent.

In terms of costs, pick and choose what you think you need. If you need an editor, but no marketing, no audio, and no video trailer, then your costs will be cheaper. Without the video trailer and audio, my costs would’ve been about $20,000. Without an editor and marketing, my costs would’ve been closer to $5000. If I used Createspace to make my cover and if I had done the design on my own, my costs would’ve been $0.

I am happy to answer questions about the process in the comments below.

 

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137 Responses to “How to Self-Publish a Bestseller: Publishing 3.0”

  1. Ben Nesvig Says:

    I’m curious what your own editing process is like. How many drafts do you put your writing through before the editor?

    Did you do any research on the pricing for the Kindle version or what made you choose $4.99?

    Ryan Holiday was a great choice and even fits with the theme of the book, since he dropped out of college and became successful.

    • James Altucher Says:

      Hey Ben,

      Before I handed it off to an editor I probably went through 5-10 rewrites on every chapter.

      I did do some research on the pricing for Kindle. It turns out that optimal pricing is 3.99. I say “optimal” for several reasons:
      a) 2.99 and above you get a 70% royalty
      b) it turns out that between 2.99 and 3.99 there isn’t a big dropoff in sales. However, between 3.99 and 4.99 there is.
      c) I made the assumption that given the marketing I was doing I could handle the 4.99 price without the big dropoff. I don’t know if I am write or wrong on that. But, as Ryan told me, “4.99 is also a way of expressing that this is a professionally done book.”

  2. Joe Choi Says:

    I always recall you and Porter arguing on TV. So I was surprised when I got his promo for your book!

    • James Altucher Says:

      Sometimes the best arguments turn into good conversations turn into friends.

      • Atit Shah Says:

        I really impressed with your blog writing and the way of your life.I did not read anything except little reading on CHOOSE YOUR SELF but i can say”You have a lot to give to the world; god bless”.
        Will see you often Mr.James.

  3. Andrzej Tucholski Says:

    Great post. I’m finishing my novel right now and all this you’re covering here will be my main topic in less than 2-3 months 🙂 I have one question though – do you need a business license to publish on Amazon or can you do it as a private person?

  4. Paul Idtse Says:

    Beautiful! This is why I wanted to arm-wrestle! Thank you for this information, James. I hope you and Claudia are well.

  5. Jessica Brookman @ N*O Says:

    *takes self out to pasture*

  6. Ree Says:

    You had a sizable internet following prior to publishing your latest book, which I’m sure made it easier to market your book. How would you alter your approach if you were a first-time author whose following consists of friends, family, and co-workers?

    • James Altucher Says:

      Well, an interent following is one thing. but a PAYING internet following is completely different. I do this blog and most of my writing for free. So what I did in the six months preceding the publication of this book was expand out to many different audiences by posting on sites where the readers had never heard of me before.

  7. Evan Salveson Says:

    First off, I read Choose Yourself, and it was fantastic. Best book I’ve read in 2013. When you set out to write Choose Yourself, did you have an outline, and/or did you have a “bullets” list that you knew you wanted to cover? Lastly, who took the picture of you sitting “criss-cross apple sauce,” with your hands on your face? That was a really cool pic and want to say great job to whomever took it.

    • James Altucher Says:

      The photo was done for a spread that the Israeli newspaper Haaretz did on me.

      The photographer was Natan Dvir. He was very good and probably took over 600 photos to find one good one. Here is his website: http://www.natandvir.com

      The photo itself cost me about $1000.

      It’s funny because I was going to use the photo you see to the left of this comment as my author photo. So Tucker Max wrote an email to Claudia and cc-ed me:

      “You gotta change it. But I’m not even going to try to convince you because I have a feeling it wouldn’t work, this email is for your wonderful wife Claudia.”

    • James Altucher Says:

      Yes, I had a rough outline but it got sharper and sharper and then kicked in even more when I worked with Nils on structuring one of my final drafts.

  8. Jill Colella Bloomfield Says:

    I have a lot of trouble hiring professionals when tasks seem figureoutable…as you suggest here, hiring pros can bring more success faster. Could you please advise what a litmus test for self-publishers might be–what questions to ask, what costs and benefits to compare, etc.–as they weigh hiring professionals. I am mostly a bootstrapper, so this is a really challenging obstacle for me. Thanks.

    • troublesometots Says:

      Ditto. Can’t wait to hear advice on this topic. There are so many people offering manuscript editing, copy editing, etc. that it’s very hard to distinguish the good from the great.

      • kamalravikant Says:

        Exactly as James’ said. The books you love, who edited them, made the covers, etc? Get those people. Since you mentioned editing, Nils Parker is amazing.

    • James Altucher Says:

      I always assume I am too stupid to know if someone is good at anything or not. This applies to my investments as well. So when I invest in something I look at who the other investors are. If they are smarter than me (e.g. if they have consistently made better investments than me over a long period of time) then I am happier co-investing with them.

      Same thing for other professionals. For instance, Nils Parker who did the editing. He has edited major bestsellers. Ryan Holiday has done the marketing for at least 5 huge bestsellers. I know the publishing industry very well over the years but their backgrounds gave me comfort that they knew what they were doing better than I would know.

    • Scott Says:

      You can also think about this the other way around: what parts of the publishing process would you most like to keep in (your) house? What skills would you most like to develop? What’s worth the time and effort to do yourself? If you’re a really good graphic designer as well as a good writer, it may be a good idea to design your own cover. If you want to get really, really good at PR, compile your own contact list and pitches (or work with a pro who has transparent processes.) Learning by doing is best, but learning by watching is faster.

  9. SJ Says:

    Hi James, I have always wanted to write something yet I am afraid that
    my friends will be judgemental on my writings. Do you think writing
    anonymously or with a screen name a good idea for me?

  10. Tom Doody Says:

    your post is generous — grazie, I underlined your text and commented here: http://901pacific.wordpress.com/2013/07/25/a-generous-author

  11. JennieB121 Says:

    Great information, James. I loved Choose Yourself and it has helped inspired me for my next project.Bookmarking this post for future reference.

  12. Saurabh Says:

    Can you please tell me about the legal rights for different countries? Is this needed when you self publish or sell hard copies of your book?

  13. MikeRhys Says:

    James; One of your most informative posts!

    All the “believe in yourself and you’ll be a success” stuff was getting overly gooey and paternalistic, but this post delivers on outlining the nuts-and-bolts, this post gets down to the brass tacks.

    Good job. (Though you could have mentioned that in building a platform it helps if you can get on CNBC … as that’s the only reason I ever knew you existed.)

    Again, good job, and thanks.

    • James Altucher Says:

      Believe it or not, TV appearances normally do not work for book sales. I have done TV for every one of my books. It has never sold anything. And I track how my different followings change (twitter, etc) after a TV appearance. Not even a blip. I am glad you saw me through CNBC but I think most people who have seen me on CNBC initially saw me through some Internet outlet.

      • MikeRhys Says:

        I’m glad you capitalized Internet there. ;->

        (You can add to your data that there is one blog follower who found you after seeing you on CNBC.)

        Take care

      • Scott Says:

        What about radio? I hear (from Tim Ferriss) that NPR is good for book PR.

        Also, who does one talk to to get invited on TV/Radio/etc? How do you figure this out?

  14. troublesometots Says:

    I am rabidly reading your updates on self-publishing (here and at copyblogger). I was recently approached by a fantastic and credible agent about representing me to take my baby sleep book through the traditional publishing track. After much hemming and hawing, I’ve decided to Choose Myself and self publish. I have no idea if this is a good move or not but I think the learning and growth that will come with it will be invaluable, even if the financial rewards are not 😉

    I have a question about reviews. I’m not worried about Amazon reviews – I’m pretty confident that with friends, family, and fans I can get 50-100 right out the gate. But what about reviews and blurbs from credible sources (newspapers, magazines, famous people, etc.)? You obviously have an impressive network and thus can get a forward by the CIO of Twitter. Sadly I don’t have those sorts of connections.

    How does the little guy get reviews and book blurbs from credible sources? Is there a process to this? Is buying blurbs OK to do? Are the paid reviews (such as Kirklus) worth it? I see these all as credibility builders that work towards making a book look less “homemade” but am a bit flummoxed about how to go about getting them.

    • James Altucher Says:

      A couple of responses:
      – quantity is better than quality. If you have 50 reviews thats actually a very high number. If they are mostly good reviews (don’t expect all good reviews) then don;t worry.

      – quality goes up if the reviewer is a “verified purchase” on Amazon
      – don’t worry about blurbs or anything like that.
      – many top Amazon reviewers have their own websites where you can contact them. Contact the ones in your area. Most won’t respond but some will and will ask for your book and write a review.

      btw, Raymond Bean has done very well self-publishing several children’s books.

      • troublesometots Says:

        “don’t worry about blurbs or anything like that.”

        Seriously? I’m trying not too. I’m also reading APE and Choose Yourself – both of which are covered with blurbs from really impressive and credible people.

        I don’t want to put out my book with a blurb on the back from “my dad”

        😉

      • James Altucher Says:

        Haha. Actually, for a book about sleeping babies a blurb from your dad might be perfect. Almost all of my blurbs came from blurbs I had for prior books or articles written about me. Think more about the book itself. Then have fun with the blurbs. Make stuff up. Have blurbs from “North West” and “George Alexander Louis”.

      • kevin Says:

        Brilliant idea with North and George, James.

      • kamalravikant Says:

        Great thing about self-publishing ,once your book gets known, you can reach out to “credible” people and update the cover and Amazon description yourself. That’s actually one of the best parts about self-publishing, you can update the book, the cover, the description, etc. anytime you want.

      • James Altucher Says:

        Very good point, Kamal.

  15. Kyle Eschenroeder Says:

    What was Lioncrest’s part in all of this madness?
    (If you still published through Createspace, what did they do?)

  16. Peter Knight Says:

    How much did editing cost on your latest book?

    It sounds to me that the two essential $ investments are for editing and cover design. What’s your advice to people who have no budget to work with? Wait with publishing until you do, or push it out to the best of one’s ability? I’m fighting the feeling of never-ending perfectionism & fear of rejection vs exercising patience to give the book the best chance of success.

    • James Altucher Says:

      My advice is to push out to the best of one’s ability. At teh very least, find friends who you trust as constructive critics (VERY rare) and ask them to read and help you with editing your book. And find at least two separate eyes other than your own to read the book for grammary, and basic copy edting.

      For cover design, try sites like fiverr. But also, Createspace will give you choices of almost two million covers. It’s not a bad choice.

      And don’t discount marketing but there are ways you can do it cheap. Find ways to get on reddit, slideshare, and other big sites, for instance.

  17. Jerry Says:

    My wife and friend went through the self-pub experience and your expressions on this blog are so familiar as I listened to them discuss their process. It all turned our quite well with a great cover, content and reviews: http://www.amazon.com/Titanic-Legacy-of-Betrayal-ebook/dp/B007TR1UYM/ref=cm_cr_pr_pb_t

  18. Mark Says:

    So, James, What’s your net-net take home so far after all expenses?

  19. Philip Davis Says:

    Thanks for sharing James – very informative, and inspiring!

  20. Guest Says:

    You hired world-class editors and I could still find errors in the text? Makes me think I may actually have found a possible second income stream for myself… 🙂

  21. Richard Greenberg Says:

    This is fucking awesome. Thanks for sharing this information. I have a novel inside of me, and you may have just helped me finally get it out.
    I’ve been reading your blog for months now. I think you’re a little bit crazy, but so what aren’t we all? I admire your honesty.

  22. Hooty Says:

    I can really see how gathering input/hiring other people especially those who specialize in the publishing field would help both you content and sales! While it is easy to have a message or tell multiple stories about you lifes journey or any other sublect. Its important that the reader doesn’t feel the contnet is all about you, is time dated/stamped (where it can become irrelavent), or doesn’t allow for them to interact with the content! (choose whether or not they agree or disagree). Those perspectives can probably only come from other peoples views of your message. Before and even after its published!) I know self-publishing has revolutionized the industry – I’ve actually seen the demise of some small publishers/resellers – even ones who tried to adapt!

  23. Mark Says:

    Did having Barry Ritholz mention you on The Big Picture help sales much?

    • James Altucher Says:

      Barry and I go back ten years so I assume our audiences overlap quite a bit. I’m sure it helped me and I’m always grateful to Barry. On that particular day I had almost 20 different marketing events happening including speaking at a conference on social media, going on HayHouse radio to a huge audience, going on thoughtcatalog to a completely different audience, doing podcasts, guest posting on Doug Casey’s newsletter, have the most viewed slideshow on slideshare, going on lifehacker, etc. So it’s hard to say.

      If anything, it would be a good company that can help figure out analytics on campaigns like this.

      • Mark Says:

        It sounds exhausting just reading about it, James. What do you do to recover from all that energy expenditure?

      • James Altucher Says:

        That was a tough two weeks. I’m not used to it. Because I still had all my usual business activities and I continued to write, etc. It was brutal.

  24. abir Says:

    Hey James,
    Thank you so much. This post has so much specific, useful information.

    What do you think the key metrics( Editing expenses, marketing dollars, # of copies sold) etc., vary if it was a mass-market fiction novel vs. a business-spirituality self-help book.

    Congratulations. Your actions and results have really inspired me.

    • James Altucher Says:

      Editing expenses would remain the same. But marketing dollars would change. I would focus more on:

      – finding top 1000 Amazon reviewers who review in your category
      – finding their websites and offering them a copy of the book. Most will say no but some will say yes.
      – find sites to advertise on that focus on your category (kindle nation daily is a good starting point)
      – participate in message boards about self-publishing. don’t just tout your book but really participate.

  25. Mike Jarvis Says:

    hehe “I do what I want” would have been a sweet book title. but really, the title just makes this book
    PS I want the shirt not the book, and i think you should double the ‘offer’ if the book is read on cotton. and i’m thinking there may be a Guinness world record somewhere in there

  26. Brett Jarman Says:

    Thank you James. For the book itself, which has inspired me to get my own under way, and for this article which helps map out some options for the path ahead. I have two questions please:

    1 – How long did the process take from once you decided to write the book to the release date?

    2 – How did that time frame compare to when you self published using 2.0?

    • James Altucher Says:

      1) It took about 8 months. Within 2 months I was ready for a first draft but then the next 6 months was rewriting, cover design, planning marketing in advance, etc.

      2) “1.0” takes about 18 months. 4 months to get a signed contract. Another 6 months to write, and then another 8 months to fit in with their schedule.

      “2.0” takes about 2 months. Write then upload. Could be faster if you write faster. Also, with “2.0” you can make a 20 page book if you want to make it even faster.

  27. John Cole Says:

    James. Loved “Choose Yourself”. Absolutely one of the best non-fiction reads I have read in the last 5 years. This post is awesome! My only question is what would you have done differently if you were self-publishing a fiction novel? I am working on a fantasy novel right now and am planning on self publishing but am looking for advice on how to take it to the next level so to speak. Any advice again would be appreciated!

    • James Altucher Says:

      Hi John, thanks a lot. I will do a separate post on marketing fiction. Will do some research beforehand, perhaps firsthand, before posting.

      • John Cole Says:

        Thanks James! That would be awesome. I am actually in the beginnings of putting together a blog that focuses solely on self publishing and how to take your work from start to finish with all of the options available…so this is great stuff!

  28. Britt Reints Says:

    I’m not clear on how Slideshare is used. Was that a target to potential readers? Did you share the link to your slideshare somewhere, or are people just perusing the site for interesting presentations?

    • James Altucher Says:

      Slideshare sends out a list of it’s most viewed presentations every week. Brasscheck made that presentation and they helped market the presentation so it would get on that list. Then the list itself generated the next several hundred thousand views. The presentation is a marketing presentation to buy my book so it helped book sales.

  29. Lisa Adams Says:

    THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU. You’re a generous guy.

  30. William Peregoy Says:

    Thanks for the breakdown, James. Inspiring stuff.

  31. Ben Nesvig Says:

    Do know if it’s possible for self-published authors to get their book trailers on the book page instead of just the author page?

  32. John McKay Says:

    Read the book (and the other freebies, too!) and enjoyed it a lot. Some really great stuff!

    I think one thing you mentioned in your post that a lot of other may have glossed over was the split-testing process you did with Facebook. This can give some real power to a product, as you can learn what will resonate with a potential customer. Those of us considering writing a book can use this before even getting started, really. Make a short list of your best book ideas, come up with 5 titles for each, and run some ads to see which one hits. You’d need a landing page of some sort, saying ‘coming soon’ or ‘sign up to be notified when the books is released.’ Once you see which has potential, you can run another round of ads, with variations on your title, etc.

    No matter how you do it, the ability to split-test a bunch of ideas is powerful, and shouldn’t be overlooked, no matter how confident you are in your idea, title, etc.

    Great blog, James!

    • James Altucher Says:

      Very smart. That’s a good idea for just starting a quick authoring business to build a passive income stream on Amazon

    • dis_quieted Says:

      What a great idea. This can be applied to so many avenues. There are such huge possibilities opened up by social media and the world of ‘choose yourself.’ This

  33. katy Says:

    yeah I was wondering if this is more for the non-fic writers, but my aunt is in the process of getting her children’s books copyedited and she wants to get an agent. I told her it would be better to self-publish. Problem is she doesn’t have the money for marketing or even deep structural (content, plot, whatever) editing. So she’s going to have to just throw it out there and cross her fingers, which is no better than trying to get an agent it seems. This is a gigantic investment up front for something that doesn’t have good odds. You should only invest all this money if it’s something you care so much about that you won’t feel like you lost something if it only sells 10 copies. And you can’t ask your friends to judge your writing (especially if it’s ficition) because your friends will never tell you it’s crap (if they value your friendship).

  34. Tranquil Polmelo(幽柚) Says:

    Hello James!

    I wonder if you have any thoughts about self academic writing or non-fiction? I’m interested in publishing Chinese literature into English, but I’m not sure if self-publishing non-fiction could become plagiarism? I don’t want to steal other people’s work, but at the same time I want to interpret and transmit their work. I feel motivated to do this because many thought-provoking humanities work is locked up in academic journals or is inaccessible to the general public.

    Keep up the good work!

  35. vinnie Says:

    Great article. It will be a great help for the publication of my book http://www.mymilliondollarstory.com

  36. Guest Says:

    Do you have an agent or publicist?

    • James Altucher Says:

      I have a foreign rights agent (I don’t want to be calling foreign publishers and they hvae all the contacts)

      And I describe my marketing agency above.

      You don’t need a literary agent at all.

  37. Charles Wilson Says:

    JA-
    I’m thiiiiiis close to finishing a book and have been advised to both copyright and ISBN the thing.
    Y/N/M?
    CW

    • James Altucher Says:

      Don’t worry too much about that. When you upload it through Createspace or equivalent they will take care of it all for you.

      • Charles Wilson Says:

        Thank you!
        I had told my family that my tombstone should carry the inscription, “He changed the world and nobody cared”. That’s changed now. How does this sound?:
        “It seemed like a good idea at the time”.

        CW

  38. Scott Says:

    I’m not aware of a book in me but the content of what you can do on your own in a different direction is inspiring.

  39. Lisa Gerber Says:

    This just made a huge impact on me. Thank you. I’ve been working on my book idea for a few months now and it seems with each step of the way, I make progress even though it’s not part of a bigger plan. The process feels like it should be tidy and it isn’t. It never is. We shouldn’t get hung up on that.

    After I read this post this morning, I sat down and wrote 1926 words. I looked at my total word count and I calculated based on your numbers here (40,000 to 80,000 words in a book) that I will have my first draft done by October 15th. It’s now marked in my calendar with all caps, as well as my two days a week I promise to dedicate to writing 2000 words.

    Today is a big day. Thanks again, James.

  40. Economics Institute Says:

    good guide, thanks. i wonder i could do it for $1000

    • James Altucher Says:

      Definitely you can. See my earlier posts on the topic. With Createspace you can almost do it for free where you have nice cover, POD for paperback, and an ebook. HOWEVER, you will miss out on the editing and marketing and audio.

  41. Nana Says:

    James, great article as usual, especially when coupled with the one about 50 shades of grey.
    I am a translator and would love to take a test with your Brazilian editor for translating your book into Brazilian Portuguese. Would it be unethical to ask who they are?

  42. dis_quieted Says:

    I bought the paperbook on Amazon, and it’s great, and I think the title you chose is the best one. But on the cover design, the font your designer chose for the reverse type on the red banner has lines and serifs that are too thin. It works for your name (black on green), but the red ink spreads into the white areas on the banner, blurring the text.
    Nothing’s perfect.

  43. Steven Says:

    How much would Command Z charge for a 58,000 word novel in terms of just a basic proofreading? I’ve written a young-adult novel and really want to self-publish. My goal is to generate a buzz for it and then make the real money by selling movie rights. I know, will never happen, but I at least want to try.
    My big problem is I need this proofread. It is difficult for me to read my own stuff and catch all the grammar errors, etc. But the CreateSpace service is pretty expensive. I’m hoping this service is a little cheaper.
    I also have another question. My novel is set in a city in which I utilize the names of the local businesses that are privately owned. Can I do that without being sued? Thank you for reading and answering my comment.

  44. LuckyPhil Says:

    I have authored 3 books will OK results but I would love to know how and who I can send my files to so I can upload them onto Amazon

  45. Tom Cooper Says:

    James,

    As an aspiring dead-tree author I’m fascinated by your post, and inspired to press on in my first publishing project.

    I totally understand the value proposition for the designer and the editor. What I’m not sure I understand is the value of doing the audiobook in a professional studio rather than in an in-home studio – what was it that made it worth the investment of time and attention? Did you have a producer helping you? Was it better quality recording? Was it better mixing? Was it better focus while in the studio? Less noise? Something else?

    • James Altucher Says:

      A professional studio was able to make me sound good, cut out all extraneous noises and then they did heavy editing (getting rid of the “uhhs” and any other slowdown, which happens 100s of times even if you are not aware of it).

      • Chris Says:

        The audio book is excellent. The sound is very good and your voice was very authentic, it really got through to me, thanks! I decided to start a company that same day. 🙂

  46. LuckyPhil Says:

    Hi James, I have written 3 books with OK results but would love to hear the process of how i can get them on Amazon regards Phil

  47. LuckyPhil Says:

    Where has my question gone ?? twice ??

  48. Josh Ingram Says:

    James, couple ideas to increase your readership. Approach public library, I guess in your case NY public library pay them a small pittance to display your book. If you’re in libraries you will reach an entire different audience, perhaps bring people online for the first time. Statistics from Pew Internet state that 85% of Americans are online, while this is a huge market, 15% is 47 million people.

    Your book looks really good, I’m going to contact my library and request they get it. So not only will I get the pleasure of reading it, hopefully other people will discover it as well

  49. Neeraj Bhatia Says:

    Many thanks James for sharing this info treasure.

    One question – I am working on my book. Its a technical book covering specific area in Information Technology. My primary objective is to build a platform which will help me in my current job, put weight on my candidature for next change, get customers so that in parallel I can start consulting work. I already started speaking at technical seminars and running (not much active though) my blog for quite some time now. After achieving all this If I can make some money that would be welcome.

    Do you think I should go for professional publishing as you explained as it would cost me big amount of money, which I hesitate to do at this time. My feeling is I should go for self-publishing.

    • James Altucher Says:

      I think you should go the cheaper route of self-publishing. Your goals are different from the author who wants to make a bestseller list or sell a gazillion copies.

      That said, definitely do heavy copyediting and get a good cover design.

  50. Heather McCurdy Says:

    Hi James, Thank you Thank you Thank you!! I have finally finished my book about walking the Camino de Santiago and working on the editing step (I’ve sent an email to Nils too, we’ll see what happens!). I wasn’t sure to self publish or sell it via a publishing house, but from what I’ve heard is that if the ph doesn’t give you a marketing budget, that you are better off doing it yourself. The advice above is so timely for me as well as informative and absolutely key in helping me make some decisions, so again thank you!
    My question for you is that I am now a SAHM running a Mom’s blog (for fun & writing practice) and my novel is in a different arena (travel/adventure). What is your advice to reconcile the two areas?
    I’d also like to suggest to those of you who are cost aware, that http://www.Fiverr.com is a great place to find inexpensive editors, book designers, audio books, etc.
    Heather M, http://www.RockStew.com

  51. Natasha Hussein Says:

    Hi James,

    Great article. I was wondering what suggestions you have for people who don’t have a massive following/ tribe? Those who wrote a book before engaging in blogging…

    With gratitude,

    Natasha

    • James Altucher Says:

      I would do two things:
      A) start building the platform. You don’t need a big one. Kevin Kelly at kk.org has an excellent post that basically says all you need is “1000 true fans”.

      B) contact reviewers among Amazon’s “top 1000 reviewers” in your category. Many of them have websites and contact info. Contact all of them. 95% won’t respond but the 5% who do have big influence. Offer to send them your book, no strings attached.

  52. Gary Says:

    One of the important points missed is the role that online community building plays in modern book publishing and marketing. I’d go as far to say that the online community *is* the modern platform. There is nothing more powerful than someone you know putting a book in your hand and saying “read this.” There are lots of innovative services out there like PressPad and LitHive that really make these kinds of capabilities accessible to those without deep pockets or technical know-how.

  53. Penigma.com Says:

    I always wanted to write a book, didn’t know it was so simple. Thanks for giving so much insight on self publishing.

  54. Sunil Godse Says:

    James, some excellent advice! I am in the process of completing a book entitled “Fail Fast. Succeed Faster” (www.failfastsucceedfaster.com), which is a collection of stories from business people on their business challenges and failures that they’ve experienced. Most are small to medium-size businesses, but there are few Canadian business icons who have given me their time and their story for the book. Reading your advice, I have taken some of the steps that you have written about. I do have a professional book editor in addition to a resource who does both book cover design and interior book layout. I find it hard to tweet but am trying to do it once every couple of days. I looked into a PR company, but this is a very expensive proposition. To garner some initial marketing, I held a conference locally which brought together 234 attendees in addition to making the local media. That will be the springboard for my initial book launch. I am then thinking of traversing the country to meet with my MBA alumni groups and any speaking opportunities I can get. Given your suggestion, I think an audiobook would be an excellent idea as well. Do you have any advice for me in terms of how I should move forward?

  55. goodelicious Says:

    Hey James, I recently purchased a Kindle and for some reason the title of your book really pulled me in. It could be the state of mind I am reading all these personal development books and the transitions I am going through in my life, but I just wanted to say I love how you keep it so real in your book. Its really simple, and it seems like we tend to over think things. I just started to read your blogs and I just wanted to say that I really appreciate everything that you have to offer in this life. Thank You man.

    Joe

  56. Misti Barnes Says:

    James,

    Does this advice apply to someone creating a daily meditation book? Don’t people want actual printed books, when it comes to meditation books?

  57. Syntax and Style Says:

    Excellent and timely.

  58. ajax jones Says:

    This should be re-published as an e-book !

  59. Stephanie Says:

    Thank you for your posting, this is a really great article.

  60. Zack Oates Says:

    Awesome article! In regards to self-publishing children’s books–what would you recommend for illustrators? And would you send an e-copy or a print copy to the highest rated commenters on Amazon?

  61. Sissy Lappin Says:

    James-I am a huge fan. A publisher offered to buy my book but the “arrangement” was laughable. Your Advice is great and I just want to say thank you for sharing.
    FYI- My book was #1 download in business/finance for a few days on Amazon (Simple and Sold). It was featured in an article. Professional versus Nonprofessional BEST ADVICE!

  62. Trent Dyrsmid Says:

    James, I’ve just finished the manuscript on my first book and it’s in the editing process right now. As you might guess, I just learned a great deal about the book publishing process from your post, so thank you for sharing all the details! The only problem I see now is that I need to seriously up my game. Damn you 🙂

  63. shamoon Says:

    @jaltucher:disqus , how did you create the hardcover version?

  64. Robert Farrell Says:

    Thank you for this! It was a little overwhelming so I’m going to go back and read it again. It was definitely helpful. I published my first book on Smashwords.

    https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/364972

    I didn’t get a lot of response even though I have a large FB and Twitter following. I also write about two blogs a day http://robertf71.blogspot.com and I do an Internet radio show. http://www.blogtalkradio.com/robert-farrell

    A lot of your ideas seem like they would take money, which I just don’t have now. Thoughts?

    Thank you again. All of this was really helpful.

  65. mechlin Says:

    Thank you James. On the notion of a platform… is it best to post about topics that will ulitmately be part of a book or could it be other topics?

  66. Ryan Martin Says:

    Hi James. Thanks for this, it really puts my mind at ease.

    Quick question: Once your book is no longer embarrassing, at what point are you getting friends, family, and peers to review it? This is before publishing, but probably after an pro editor helped clean it up.

    Any strategy here?

    I recall Tim Ferriss said he sends out sections of his books, not the whole thing. He’s quite secretive during this stage … which is kind’a tripping me up.

    These early reviewers, one would hope, will be your earliest fans and supporters.

    Any direction much appreciated.

  67. Megan Bearce, LMFT Says:

    Amazing article! I took the leap and became an independent publisher of my own book for all the reason you listed. Hired editor, inside designer, cover designer, and now a publicist. It’s been a huge learning process but really fun too. I wish I would have read this earlier for those days I questioned myself. Still working on continuing to build the platform. Am considering an audiobook after reading this. Wondering your thoughts on paying for reviews with Kirkus and Publishers Select (if picked). Both have different processes for self-published books. Congrats on your continued success! -Megan Bearce, LMFT author of Super Commuter Couples: Staying Together When A Job Keeps You Apart.

  68. cindy Says:

    James, i’m writing my first ebook. I can manage only 50 pages now. Should I charge for it?

    http://www.traveljo.com

  69. Mike Searles Says:

    Headline hooked me
    Had to look…
    ‘How-to publish
    My best-seller book’

    Read your post
    Twice the way through
    And the comments
    OK – I skipped a few

    Now I hate you
    James, you’re a (bleep)!
    My brain is now firing
    There’s no chance of sleep!

    Thanks mate. Terrific post.

  70. Jane Peskara Says:

    well very interesting, i am a writer well i love writing but never published or tried to publish anything even though i always wanted, my dream is having ppl holding my books in their hands and reading, and well wouldnt be that bad to live from it as i cant work due to mental health problems, anyway i am 23 live in austria and now thinking about selfpublishing so here a few questions: Where should i do it, there are so many pages. how can i do all this stuff you described with having no money at all? and well i am having many accounts on social networks but well sadly not many followers, friends etc. support me or go on my homepage and share etc. any advices? would be really nice if u answer, thx a lot 🙂

  71. Bumi Kristen Says:

    This has to be one of the most generous posts I’ve ever read. Thanks for freely sharing your resources for publicity, marketing, etc. I’ve read similar posts by other big name authors, and they seem to withhold just enough detail to leave you marveling at their genius and wondering how in the world you could ever do what they did.

  72. Joe Says:

    Remember reading in Choose Yourself that you’re a Woody Allen fan, so thought of you when watching Woody interviewing Billy Graham back in the day.

    If you haven’t seen it, go give yourself a laugh: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K_poGsbBgpE

    -Joe

  73. brumo Says:

    Hi James, just found you via a blogpost.
    Wanted to go to bed 90 minutes ago; thanks for keeping me up!

    I have a variety of categories which include coaching, single parenting, child abduction, CBS News playing key role in kidnapping while lying to me, missing children’s organizations, FBI to name a few….I love to write…and have contacted the author of “The Mentor” because I believe he can help me put out a quality product on my first effort.

    Wondering about non-fiction genres; I am all about positive mindset, helping people put their challenges into the perspective that can best help them move forward with the right attitude. Is it naive to think that “telling my stories” might be able to be a commercial success?

    Any suggestions of things to think about are welcome.

    Really have enjoyed reading some of your blog posts….
    Bruce

  74. UFANY Says:

    Hi James, awesome post, really cool. But wait. You sold about 44K copies in the first month, 20K of which came from Email Marketing? Completely independant of your own platform (at least in terms of distribution). It means that pretty much any good self-published book can reach these volumes through Email Marketing right? Even though margins are lower..

  75. Ohana de Oliveira Says:

    Great, when I read that you sold to Brazil I finally could fine your book in Portuguese here =] Had no idea we had a translation, I was planning to buy in English on Amazong but now I will buy it in the bookstore here, Saraiva is the name!

  76. Huib Kraaijeveld Says:

    Dear James,

    I’ve started a local crowdfund campaign to write a book about a non sexy topic for a target audience of potentially 5 billion people that mostly do not realize it might be relevant to them ….

    The topic is Lyme Disease. Could you take a look and give me feedback? Being author, entrepreneur, salesman 4.0, crowd funder and publisher is a bit new to me, yet I deeply feel it is important to do this.

    http://www.momo-development.com

    Thank you!

  77. Alex Iglecia Says:

    James, I’m a new reader. I found and chose CHOOSE YOURSELF at B&N. Gratitude and WOW.

  78. Williesha Morris Says:

    Dude. Dude. Dude! I’m going to use every one of these suggestions. If it sells you will be one of my “little people.” No seriously, I needed reccomendations, so thank you.

  79. Bybreen Samuels Says:

    Hi James, fantastic article and very timely. I’ve just finished writing a book for non profit organisations. It’s currently being edited and I’m definately going down the self publishing route. I’ve been approached by a contact who I met in China. He works in the corporate world and is keen to know whether my book will be available in China. We are due to have an initial conversation on Monday. Currently, I don’t have a foreign rights agent. Is it necessary for me to have one? And / or, is this an opportunity to initiate a commercial transaction based on a bulk sale of my book into the corporate sector. What do you think would be a good approach at this stage?

  80. nuitgoddess Says:

    Seems like your advice is generally applicable for non-fiction.

  81. Terry The Canadian Curator Says:

    I am new to this conversation. I have a novel ready for publication. Is there a step by step formatting manual somewhere I can follow so I can upload without glitches to Createspace? (Being a techno-tard I require simple – real simple). As far as marketing goes – I have $0 – but lots of time).
    Thank you James (as well as other self-published writers) – for any assistance you can give.
    Terry McDonald Writer from Port Credit, Ontario, Canada.
    P.S. My apologies for the digression and veering off-topic but Fukishima is extremely worrisome. Apart from the UN R2P argument – the International Community is falling down big-time in alerting the world public and sending experts and equipment to deal with TEPCO’s and the Japanese Governments’ inadequate response! The radiation levels being reported on land and immediate surrounding Ocean there, and now on North American coast and soil, is shocking. Anyone else feel this? (Incredible ramifications for all humanity if they do not up their game – our! game).

  82. Steve Bohne Says:

    Did anyone get anything from the commandz site except a picture of a dog on his back? Tool.

  83. Matt Dragon Says:

    James,
    Choose Yourself helped me get off my ass and finally publish a book. I also found a fellow e-book author Von Money who’s work on publishing helped me tremendously. I think you’d like the book, if you want to check it out here it is: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00HUTA9CI

    I’m not rich and I’m not previously published so this is sort of a case study.

    After writing that book I’ve brain stormed books that would appeal to people from a marketing sense (fill and need) and I’ve started writing two and am creating an outline for two more in my head.

    As always action is getting the creative juices flowing.

    Thank you for sharing so much of yourself with us. Bleeding into your writing is something I do in my blog and I appreciate that you do the same!

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